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Using Formalin for CL Goats Print E-mail
Written by Administrator-GL   
Monday, 31 March 2008
Article Index
Using Formalin for CL Goats
Page 2
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CASEOUS LYMPHADENITIS

What is it and how to cope with it?

CASEOUS LYMPHADENITIS The lymph system filters the bacteria from the goat's body and pushes it outside into thick-walled encapsulated abscesses so that it can't harm the goat. Visible abscesses don't appear for months after infection as the lymph system slowly filters the bacteria. Abscesses can be internal, but there is much debate about frequency and correlation of occurance with external abscesses. Abscesses are attached to the back side of the skin rather than the goat's body. Like so many things about goats, we don't have sufficient research to give definitive answers.

Not all abscesses are caused by corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, but those appearing at lymph-gland sites (often under the ear but not always) should be considered suspect and investigated. CL is an equal-opportunity infection -- no breed or sex is exempt. A burst CL abscess is virtually unmistakable; pus is cheesy, toothpaste-thick, whitish/yellowish -- and very infectious. A simple and inexpensive blood test can be performed to diagnose infection. There are several testing methods, but they are unreliable on animals under eight months of age; "false negatives" are high, particularly on goats showing no visible signs of infection. The most accurate testing is done on exudate (pus) taken from the abscess itself.

Because the thick pus is enclosed in a tough fibrous capsule which medicine cannot penetrate, antibiotic treatment is ineffective against the CL bacteria. Caseous Lymphadenitis is currently considered incurable. Existing vaccine available in the USA is for use with sheep and the manufacturer stresses not using it on goats. Autogenous vaccines -- made from a specific herd's infectious pus -- are sometimes helpful but often only slow down the rate of infection. Colorado Serum Company is developing a CL vaccine for goats that should be available to producers sometime in spring/summer 2008.

Handling visible CL abscesses can be done in two ways: (1) Lance and remove the pus, exposing the goat and all other goats to possible contact with the CL bacteria, or (2) Inject Formalin (10% buffered formaldehyde) into the abscess to "embalm" it and let it fall off in non-contagious *scab* form. I have done a lot of research on CL as it affects goats. I used to recommend confining the animal and lancing/draining the pus, but timing is critical as the abscess forms, matures, and goes from hard to soft with easy-to-burst thin skin covering it. I've learned that Formalin (classified as a *disinfectant*) best controls this disease. Note: I am not a vet and the usage of Formalin is 'off-label,' as is so much that goat producers use. The plus side of using Formalin to manage CL abscesses is no exposure of the bacteria either to the environment or other goats, no long-term isolation of treated animals, and less stress on both the producer and the goat. As long as Formalin is carefully injected inside the abscess, it is highly unlikely that it could penetrate its thick walls and migrate into body tissues or organs. Sub-cutaneous abscesses peel off with the hide at slaughter, and internal organ abscesses are easy to identify, condemn, and discard. Read my article on CL Management Using Formalin on the Articles page for details. Some vets are beginning to use this method for CL management

CL is a fact of life in goats (and sheep). If you don't have it yet, you will have it. You don't have to own or buy infected goats; flies can carry the bacteria from nearby infected animals and bring it to your goats. Unless you want to destroy goats that can be salvaged and utilized, Formalin makes a good partner in controlling CL .When Colorado Serum's new CL vaccine for goats is available, I urge all producers to buy it and use it. I am proud that my efforts over the years to convince Colorado Serum to produce a CL vaccine for goats is seeing results. This company that previously saw no significant market for a goat-specific CL vaccine has now decided to develop it. Let's prove to Colorado Serum that we truly need this vaccine and appreciate their taking the risk to develop it by buying and using it. The vaccine will not require a prescription, will be safe to use on pregnant does, and will not cause painful side effects. Companies such as Register Distributing, Jeffers will carry the product.

CLA Abscess before  and after using formalin

photo credit Goat-Link.com goatlady


CASEOUS LYMPHADENITIS - MANAGING WITH FORMALIN

Caseous Lymphadenitis is a contagious bacterial infection that appears at lymph gland sites as abscesses. Not all abscesses are CL, but those appearing at typical CL sites (often under the ear, but not always) should be considered suspect and investigated. Because the bacteria Corynebacterium Pseudotuberculosis is resistant to all antibiotics, whether systemically injected into the goat or directly placed into the abscess, Caseous Lymphadenitis (CL) should be considered neither curable nor completely preventable at this time. This article offers an effective alternative method for managing and controlling it.

Caseous Lymphadenitis is a fact of life in meat-goat herds. Like a car wreck, if you drive, your turn will come. If you buy and sell goats or have any significant number of them, you are going to encounter CL. Transmission vectors (ways to spred the disease) run the gamut from insects and animals to tires, clothing and the soles of footwear of people who enter your property. Prepare yourself in advance on how to manage and control CL. Unlike Caprine Arthritic Encephalitis (CAE) and Johnes Disease, CL does not damage the health of the goat. CL is primarily a management and nuisance issue.

The CL vaccine made for sheep has not been approved for goats. The manufacturer, Colorado Serum, recommends against its usage with goats for several reasons, including painful injection-site reactions and also because no studies have been done that conclusively prove its effectiveness against CL. Goat producers who choose to use this sheep vaccine on their goats do so at their own risk. Colorado Serum currently has under development a vaccine to prevent CL in goats and hopes to have it available for producers to purchase and use sometime in 2008. The time it taking to get this new product to market is significantly affected by federal government regulatory requirements and the speed with which they process the documentation provided by Colorado Serum.

The basic premise behind vaccines is the introduction of a small amount of the illness-causing bacteria into the animal's body in order to stimulate its immune system to develop antibodies against it. If a goat already has the CL organism in its body, usage of the vaccine can activate the bacteria to form an abscess, usually at the injection site. Since laboratory tests for Caseous Lymphadenitis are far from perfect and are affected by the maturity of the goat's immune system (especially in animals under six to eight months of age), the producer cannot be sure that the goat has not already been exposed to the CL bacteria. When the CL vaccine for goats becomes available, vaccinate all your goats and deal with any abscesses if they arise.

Many people who have Caseous Lymphadenitis in their herds refuse to acknowledge its existence because of the stigma currently associated with having it in your herd. I accept some responsibility for the prevalence of this attitude, because I was originally fearful of this disease and urged culling. However, by taking this approach, we goat producers are hurting ourselves. We need a vaccine to prevent this disease in goats. I am proud that in some small part my efforts to convince the folks at Colorado Serum to produce a CL vaccine for goats is seeing results. This company that previously viewed a CL vaccine for goats as unprofitable has now decided that there is merit and potential profit in developing and marketing the vaccine.

I have done lots of research on CL as it affects goats. When I first began writing about CL, my opinion was to destroy any goat infected with it. Since then I've had many hours of discussions with goat producers, serum manufacturers, lab technicians, veterinarians, and others involved in the meat-goat industry. I've learned that there is an effective method available for handling Caseous Lymphadenitis that permits producers to keep (and not have to cull) valuable breeding animals.

For years on ChevonTalk, the Internet meat-goat education and discussion group that I own on Yahoogroups, Dr. Rosemarie Szostak has recounted how she gained control over Caseous Lymphadenitis in her herd. Dr. Szostak, who holds a PhD in chemistry and is also a goat owner, injected Formalin into the abscesses. Formalin, classified as a disinfectant, is a 10% buffered solution of formaldehyde. I have concluded that my original rejection of this course of treatment was wrong. While Formalin usage will not cure CL (nothing will, at present), it does provide an effective management and control alternative.

I used to recommend confining the infected goat, lancing the abscess, draining the exudate (pus), and medicating the site. The problem is that if this procedure is not done at precisely the right time and under the right conditions, the situation deteriorates. If the abscess is lanced too soon, it festers and gets worse. Very little if any pus and (sometimes) lots of fluid is present, since the abscess has not matured to the stage at which the pus is soft enough to be squeezed out. If the cutting is done too late, the risk is that the knot may rupture on its own -- contaminating the other goats and their environment. Either way, this infectious bacteria has a great chance of finding a home on your property.

 The right time to open and clean out an abscess is when the hair is just beginning to come off and the knot is becoming soft. The problem is that this seems to occur in differing time frames in individual goats. (I suspect that this is related to the efficiency of the individual goat‚s immune system as well as the amount of CL bacteria present in its body.) Some CL abscesses seem to appear almost overnight (they really don't -- producers just haven't been observant enough), while other goats have knots appear very slowly and literally take weeks or months to develop from undefined mass into a roundish abscess. Some abscesses encapsulate into several knots, while others become a single mass. Pregnant does are a special problem, because the producer obviously doesn't want newborn kids exposed to the CL bacteria. The producer who owns many goats has a huge problem trying to isolate every infected goat, while watching and waiting for that 'right time' to clean out the abscess.

Note: This writer is not a vet and the usage of Formalin is not approved for this specific purpose. Producers may find difficulty in locating and purchasing this product. (You may contact me for sources.) Like so much of what we producers have to use with goats, this is an off-label/extra-label usage (that does not necessarily mean it is illegal, by the way), so no withdrawal time information is available. Remember, however, that CL abscesses encapsulate; they create a thick wall around the exudate (pus), isolating the infected material from the rest of the goat's body. This is why systemic injections of antibiotics are unsuccessful. The medication cannot get through those thick walls. Therefore, it is highly unlikely that Formalin would be able to migrate to any other part of the goat's body. (Because of the unique nature of this bacteria, direct injection of antibiotics into the abscess doesn‚t work either.) When the goat is slaughtered and the hide is removed, subcutaneous (under-the-skin) abscesses peel off with the hide. Internal organs that are susceptible to abscesses, such as udders and lungs, go into the offals (trash) bucket as parts of the goat that are not eaten. Such abscesses are very visible in the organs of slaughtered goats, making them easy to recognize and discard.

Step-by-Step: How to Use Formalin

Supplies needed: 3cc Luer-lock syringes, 25 gauge needles, disposable gloves, paper towels, protective eye wear, small plastic Wal-Mart type bags, 7% iodine or equivalent in a squeeze bottle with an applicator tip, #10 disposable scalpels, 18 gauge needles, container into which broken and bent needles can be placed, bleach, bottle of 10% buffered Formalin, small-animal portable electric clippers or hand-operated hair-cutting scissors, and a strong person to hold the goat very still.

The first step is to determine if the abscess is really CL. There are many types of abscesses. If you are in doubt about the abscess, inject an 18 gauge needle into the knot. Try to pull out some of the pus. If you cannot aspirate pus from the abscess and it is located at a lymph gland site, it is probably a CL abscess.

Feel the knot. If you can move the skin over it, the abscess is NOT ready for Formalin injection (or lancing). If you can get your fingers almost completely around the abscess and pull it away from the body, this means that the abscess is now adhered to the underside of the hide and almost always is soft enough to inject Formalin. (If the pus inside the abscess is still hard, Formalin cannot mix with it and kill the bacteria.) If you wait until the hair is completely off the abscess, the skin will be drawn too tight and thin and injecting Formalin will probably cause it to rupture. Formalin injection is most successful when the knot is soft, still has hair on it, and can be pulled away from the body by wrapping your fingers around it as described above.

Using a 3 cc Luer-lock syringe (to prevent the needle from blowing off the syringe if the knot is not soft enough) and a 25-gauge needle (to produce as small a hole as possible to prevent Formalin back flow), have one or two people hold the goat still. Placing the goat on its side usually allows greater control over the animal‚s movements. Think of the abscess as a clock face and inject parallel to the body into the abscess at the 12 o‚clock position (when the goat is on its feet) so that when the goat stands up, the Formalin is less likely to run out. Be positive that the needle is in the abscess and NOT in the goat‚s body. Be aware of major artery and vein locations in order to avoid them ˆ particularly the jugular vein in the goat‚s neck. While slowly pushing the syringe‚s plunger, move the needle inside the abscess in a windshield wiper motion to better distributed Formalin throughout the soft pus.

Start with a 3 cc syringe filled with Formalin and fill the abscess until it is firm but not tight. Huge abscesses the size of an orange or larger may require as much as 9 cc‚s of Formalin at first injection. I would not recommend using more than 9 cc‚s of Formalin per application. Overfilling the abscess can result in swelling around the abscess and short-term discomfort to the goat. Hold a paper towel over the injection site when the needle is removed to prevent Formalin from flowing back out, much like a lab technician does when drawing blood. Some goats appear to feel the flow of Formalin, possibly in the form of coldness or pressure. I‚ve seen some goats lick as if they taste it when Formalin is injected in an abscess under the ear, but I believe that they are reacting to the pressure of the abscess‚ being filled rather than tasting it. It is, after all, encapsulated inside the abscess. If this behavior occurs, it is a very short-term reaction. Mostly the goat doesn‚t like being held. Confinement of the goat in your isolation pen is recommended until you are positive that you have the abscess sufficiently filled with Formalin.

Sometimes abscesses occur within abscesses. Check the goat‚s abscesses for several days after initial injection of Formalin, feeling for soft spots. It will always feel slightly soft around the perimeter of the abscess where it meets the goat‚s body, as it should; you don‚t want risk putting Formalin in the goat‚s body. Inject more Formalin into any remaining soft spots. The goal is to achieve a hard (embalmed) knot. Formalin combines with and „hardens‰ the pus quickly. Once the abscess feels hard all over, leave it alone. Over a period of weeks, it will shrink as a hard black/grayish thick scab develops. Eventually the scab will loosen around the perimeter‚s edges and either fall off or need to be gently pulled off. The hardened abscess that comes off will have dry pus inside that has been disinfected by the Formalin; dispose of it properly. Fresh pink skin will appear inside a slightly-recessed hole. Flush with 7% iodine or equivalent and let it heal. If the first healing is lumpy and uneven, pull it off and let it re-heal in a smoother fashion so it will hair over and the scar will not be visible. If done correctly, no visible evidence of a CL abscess will exist.

Chest abscesses seem to be the hardest to control with Formalin, since the chest wall allows space for huge knots to develop. In such instances, the producer must use several cc's of Formalin over a period of multiple days to make sure that the abscess is fully filled with Formalin. Sometimes these large abscesses clear up faster and better if they are lanced. If, when injecting Formalin into any CL abscess, the knot bursts because the skin is already too thin, cleanly lance it with a #10 disposable scalpel, squeeze out all the pus, and flush with 7% iodine or equivalent. Isolation of the animal after any lancing procedure is essential. CL pus is whitish/grayish in color and thick (the consistency of toothpaste). It has no odor.

If you get Formalin on your skin or in your eyes or mucous membranes, flush thoroughly with clean tap water. While applying Formalin to the hoof of a goat with hoof rot, I have gotten Formalin in my eye (under my contact lens) and it didn‚t sting or affect my eyesight. Formalin is odorless, colorless, and the consistency of water.

After four to six weeks (sometimes longer), the abscess begins to shrivel and dry up and then peel off, much like a corn on your foot to which you've applied corn remover. This 'embalmed' material should not be infectious if treatment has been done properly.

The plus side of using Formalin to manage CL abscesses is no exposure of the bacteria to either the environment or other goats, no long-term isolation of the treated animals, and less stress on the producer. The negatives include off-label usage and the possible objection of some authorities to this application.

Each producer must do his own due diligence and decide which course of action to follow when dealing with Caseous Lymphadenitis. It is this writer's opinion that unless goat breeders want to continue destroying good animals and incurring the financial losses that such decisions bring, then we all had better learn how to manage and control Caseous Lymphadenitis when it appears in our herds. When the Colorado Serum vaccine for CL in goats comes on the market, we should all immediately purchase it and use it to protect our animals and indicate our appreciation to this company for going out on a financial limb to develop it. Colorado Serum makes more goat medications than any other manufacturer.

 

You Can purchase 10% Buffered Formalin at Valley Vet Supply


Caseous Lymphadenitis Abscesses:

This writer has detailed articles on both Caseous Lymphadenitis (with a diagram of common CL sites) and on all types of Abscesses (including CL) on the Articles page of her website: http://www.tennesseemeatgoats.com. Caseous Lymphadenitis is a contagious bacterial infection that appears at lymph gland sites as abscesses. Not all abscesses are CL, but those occurring at typical CL sites (often but not always under the ear) should be considered suspect and investigated. Because this bacteria is resistant to antibiotic treatment (see details later in this article) , Caseous Lymphadenitis should be considered neither curable nor completely preventable. This article provides an alternative method for managing and controlling it.

Caseous Lymphadenitis is a fact of life in meat-goat herds. If you buy and sell goats or have any significant numbers of them, you are going to encounter CL at some point in time. A wise producer will have a plan in place for handling it.

The CL vaccine made for sheep has not been approved for goats. The manufacturer, Colorado Serum, recommends against its usage with goats for several reasons, including painful injection-site reactions and the lack of empirical proof that it works. Goat producers who choose to use this sheep vaccine on their goats do so at their own risk. Colorado Serum is diligently working towards developing and getting approval for a safe, effective CL vaccine for goats for release during 2005. How it can be used effectively will be the subject of much discussion when this vaccine becomes available. As is the case with most vaccines, it will not work in goats already infected with Caseous Lymphadenitis. This writer is proud that in some small part her efforts to convince the good folks at Colorado Serum to produce a CL vaccine for goats is seeing results. Formalin, by the way, is used as an approved, safe, and effective preservative in drug and vaccine manufacturing.

When I first began writing about CL, my opinion was to destroy any goat infected with it. Since then I've held many discussions with goat producers, serum manufacturers, lab technicians, veterinarians, and others involved in the meat-goat industry. I've discovered that there are effective methods available for handling Caseous Lymphadenitis that permit producers to keep and not cull or kill valuable goats.

I used to recommend confining the infected goat, lancing the knot, draining the exudate (pus), and flushing the abscess with 7% iodine. I've learned that if this procedure is not done at precisely the right time and under the right conditions, the situation can actually be made worse. If the abscess is cut too soon, its contents are solid and it cannot be cleared. At one stage of development, no pus is present but lots of hard-to-contain and very liquid fluid emerges. In both instances, the abscess has not matured to the stage at which the pus is soft enough to be removed. If the cutting is done too late, the risk incurred is that the knot may rupture on its own -- contaminating other goats and their environment. In each instance, this very infectious bacteria has a great chance of finding a home on your property.


For years on ChevonTalk, the Internet meat-goat discussion group of which I am owner, Dr. Rosemarie Szostak has explained how she gained control over Caseous Lymphadenitis in her herd. Dr. Szostak, a PhD in chemistry and a goat owner, injected formalin into the abscesses. Formalin, a well-known-in-professional-circles disinfectant, is a 10% buffered solution of formaldehyde. I have concluded that my original rejection of this course of treatment was wrong. While formalin usage will not cure CL (nothing will, at present), it does provide an attractive management/control alternative. A veterinarian friend who attended the February 2004 meeting of the Western States Veterinary Conference in Las Vegas, Nevada told this writer that no less a renowned goat health expert than Dr. Mary Smith of Cornell University spoke to the group about injecting formalin into CL abscesses.


Injecting formalin into a CL abscess requires the use of a Luer-lock syringe (so the needle does not slip off the syringe, back-spraying formalin), a 25-gauge needle (the very small size used for dogs and cats), disposable gloves, paper towels, eye goggles, and a strong person to hold the goat very still. The small-diameter needle is necessary because formalin is the consistency of water, so it runs out easily if larger-gauge needles are used. (The higher the gauge number, the smaller the diameter of needle.) Think of the abscess as a clock face and inject downward into the knot at 12:00 o'clock (when the goat is in an upright position) as close to the goat's body as possible but stay inside the abscess. Avoid veins, arteries, and nerve endings; formalin injected into the goat's body will kill or cause nerve paralysis. On a small knot that is about the size of a dime or a nickel, start with 1/2 cc formalin. For larger knots, use 1 cc to 3 cc. Using too much formalin can result in tissue swelling both at and surrounding the injection site. Hold a paper towel lightly over the injection site when the needle is removed to stop the fluid from running out, much like a lab technician does when blood is drawn from a human arm. Too much pressure will cause the fluid to run out of the abscess. The producer may have to inject formalin a second time, several days later, if the knot has not hardened. The goal is a hard ('embalmed') knot. This means that sufficient formalin has gotten inside the abscess and mixed with the pus. Be careful when re-injecting a partially-hardened knot; the formalin may blow back if the plunger is unable to push it into the hardened abscess. If formalin does get onto skin or into eyes, generously flush with clear water and there should be no adverse reaction. Formalin was used as a fresh-milk preservative in the early 1900's; generations of Americans consumed it, so don't be overly concerned if it gets on skin or in eyes. Flush well with water. Formalin is currently used in multiple consumer products as a preservative.

Chest abscesses seem to be the hardest to control with formalin, since the chest wall allows space for huge knots to develop. In such instances, the producer must use several cc's of formalin over a period of multiple days to make sure that the abscess is fully saturated with the product. In cases of very large orange- or grapefruit-sized abscesses, lancing and cleaning the abscess may be necessary; sufficient amounts of formalin are difficult to diffuse throughout such large abscesses.


The plus side of using formalin to manage CL abscesses is no exposure of the bacteria to either the environment or other goats, no long-term isolation of the treated animals, and less stress on the producer.

The negatives include off-label usage and the possible objection of some people to this application.

Each producer must do his own due diligience and decide which course of action to follow when dealing with Caseous Lymphadenitis. It is this writer's opinion that unless goat breeders want to continue destroying animals and incurring the financial losses that such decisions bring, then we all had better learn how to manage and control Caseous Lymphadenitis when it appears in our herds.

 

8 Week Photo Timeline of FormalinTreated CLA Abscess



Last Updated ( Sunday, 20 March 2011 )
 
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