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All information provided in these articles is based either on personal experience or information provided by others whose treatments and practices have been discussed fully with a vet for accuracy and effectiveness before passing them on to readers.
In all cases, it is your responsibility to obtain veterinary services and advice before using any of the information provided in these articles. We are not veterinarians. Neither Goat-Link.com nor any of the contributors to this website will be held responsible for the use of any information contained herein.
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Goat Medication Chart Print E-mail
Written by Administrator-GL   
Thursday, 17 July 2008

Goat Medications

I have researched many goat related articles and magazines, both online and off to gather as much needed information as I could on goat medicines and their usage. Many of these drugs I am familiar with from personal usage.
For in depth information on FDA Approved Animal Drugs visit the NADA/ANADA online data base search system.
For information on which drugs should be avoided for food producing animals visit: FARAD (Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database).
I am NOT a vet and before you administer ANY medications to your goat- you should always check with your veterinarian! This site is meant to be a guideline only and it does not take the place of a good working relationship with your veterinarian.
OTC means you can buy this Over The Counter at you local feed stores or through supply houses
Rx means this is a medication that requires a prescription from your vet

Prices listed have been determined from the catalogs of Jeffers Livestock Supply and Valley Vet Supply. They have been listed to give you an idea of what your medications would cost, Not as a guarantee.

What you need to know BEFORE administering ANY medications to your goats.
Medications- What You Need to Know
Injections- The Details

Medication Fact Sheet for Goats


Injectable Antibiotics
Name of Medication Type of Medication Usage Approx Cost
Agri-Cillin
Han-Pen B
(Penicillin procaine G)
OTC Antibiotic
Dosage:
Injectable dose is 5mls per 100lb goat given SQ every 24 hours for 5 days. Use a larger (18ga) needle for this thick medication.
Adverse Reactions:
May cause swelling at injection site.
Contraindications:
Do not give IM, as any penicillin can be fatal if injected into the bloodstream. Always draw back on your plunger!
Not as effective as other antibiotics for pneumonia.
Storage:
Refrigerate. Separation may occur due to cold temperature. To redissolve, warm and then shake the bottle.

$6.95
100ml bottle
Bio-Mycin 200
LA-200
(Long Acting)
Maxim200
(Oxytetracycline)
200mg/ml
OTC Antibiotic
NOT to be confused with Tylan200! They are not the same medication.
All of these name brands are 200mg/ml oxytetracycline. This antibiotic is effective against both gram negative and gram positive bacteria. Used widely for chlamydia, pink eye, metritis (uterine infection) , navel ill in kids. When used for pink eye the medication is dripped into the eye. Can also be used with sterile saline as a uterine douche.
Dosage:
Injectable dose is 5mls per 100lb goat given SQ every 24 hours for 5 days. The carrier in LA200 makes the medication sting more than the others.
Adverse Reactions:
This particular medication deteriorates with age and becomes toxic to the kidneys. Photosensitivity, may inhibit bone growth young animals. Avoid in early stages of pregnancy. Contraindications:
Always draw back on your plunger! Do not use if kidney failure is suspected.
Storage:
Keep cool.

$8.95
$14.95
$12.00
100ml bottle
Gallimycin 100
(erythromycin)
100mg/ml
OTC Antibiotic
100mg/ml
Used as treatment for upper respiratory infections, shipping fever, pneumonia and dysentery prevention in newborn lambs.
Dosage:
Injectable dose is 4mls per 100lb goat given SQ daily..
Adverse Reactions:
Do NOT use for intra-mammory infusions as it may cause allergic reactions.
Contraindications:
none known- an old medication now becoming popular again.
Storage:
Keep cool.

$12.95
100ml bottle
Long Acting Penicillin (Penicillin procaine & penicillin benzathine combination) OTC Antibiotic
This is the long acting penicillin, but the absorption rate that makes it long lasting is too slow to be effective in most systemic infections.
Dosage:
Injectable dose is 5mls per 100lb goat given SQ every 24 hours for 5 days. Use a larger (18ga) needle for this thick medication.
Adverse Reactions:
May cause swelling at injection site.
Contraindications:
Do not give IM, as any penicillin can be fatal if injected into the bloodstream. Always draw back on your plunger!
Not as effective as other antibiotics for pneumonia.
Storage:
Refrigerate. Separation may occur due to cold temperature. To redissolve, warm and then shake the bottle.

$7.95
100ml bottle
Oxy-Tet 100
(oxytetracycline)
100mg/ml
OTC Antibiotic
100mg/ml
Dosage:
Injectable dose is 5mls per 50lb goat given SQ every 24 hours for 5 days.
Adverse Reactions:
This particular medication deteriorates with age and becomes toxic to the kidneys. Photosensitivity, may inhibit bone growth young animals. Avoid in early stages of pregnancy. Contraindications:
Avoid use in early pregnancy and for animals suffering from kidney disorders.
Storage:
Keep cool.

$21.95
500ml bottle
Tylan 200
(tylosin)
OTC Antibiotic
My personal choice for OTC upper respiratory infection and pneumonia medication. Tylosin is used against gram positive bacteria. Also used for shipping stress, pink eye and foot rot. Used as an eye drop for pink eye.
Dosage:
Kids: 1-2ml SQ; Adults: 5mls per 100lb SQ every 24 hours for 5 days. Use a larger (18ga or 20ga) needle for this thickish medication.
Adverse Reactions:
Stings and goat may cry out or limp directly after injection. May cause swelling at injection site.
Contraindications:
DO NOT use on equines- May be fatal!
Storage:
Keep cool

$21.95
250ml bottle

Injectable Vaccines
name type usage cost
Bar-Guard-99
E.Coli antiserum
OTC E.Coli antiserum
Contains both the pilus antigen K99 and E.Coli antiserum. Gives immediate protection from E. Coli to newborns. Administer directly after birth.
Dosage:
Orally- 2 mls.
Storage:
Refrigerate.
$6.45
10ml bottle
Baytril 100 (Enrofloxacin) Rx Extra-label use of fluoroquinolones, including Baytril 100, in food animals is prohibited under Title 21, Part 530.41, of the Code of Federal Regulations
Mainly used against gram-negative organisms. To be used only after other antibiotic therapies have failed.
Dosage:
Injectable dose at 1ml per 20 lbs. for five consecutive days.
Adverse Reactions:
Can cause tenderness and swelling in joints in adult animals and prohibits normal cartilage and joint formation in young animals. Swollen joints and lameness. Seizures caused by CNS stimulation.
Contraindications:
Do not use in food producing animals. Do not use in young, developing animals.
Storage:
Do not refrigerate, freeze or store above 104F degrees. Separation may occur due to cold temperature. To redissolve, warm and then shake the bottle.
Store Baytril at room temperature. This antibiotic breaks down if cooled and warmed too many times.
$69.95
100ml bottle
Biosol liquid (Neomycin Sulfate) OTC Antibacterial Oral liquid Indicated for the treatment and control of colibacillosis (bacterial enteritis) caused by E coli susceptible to neomycin sulfate. Dosage is 1/2 tsp/50lbs body weight orally. ( 1 tsp = 5ccs) Keep cool, 68-77F degrees.
Bo-Se
Mu-Se
Myosel-B
Rx Injectable Vitamin E & Selenium Supplement for selenium deficiency. Selenium deficiency causes white muscle disease in goats. Since selenium deficiency exists at different levels throughout the US
Look at the Map

It is critical to follow your vet's directions! This can be stored in the body and over dose IS possible-with sometimes fatal effects. I have been instructed by my veterinarian to use this product at the rate of 1cc/40lbs body weight. Do not use in pregnant ewes. Goat producers agree that if this product is used in the case of suspected white muscle disease already showing symptoms of weak back legs, use of this product will show results within a few hours of treatment.
CHX Guard LA (.12% Chlorhexidine Gluconate) Rx Aids in treatment of Sore Mouth. Contains an effective antibacterial agent in a long-acting gel. This adhesive-based gel adheres to the gums, thereby increasing the amount of time the antibacterial agent is in the animals mouth.
CMT (California Mastitis Test Kit) OTC A test to quickly detect mastitis. Not always accurate-Cannot be used accurately while mother has colostrum.
Colostrum Supplements and Replacers OTC Nutritional Supplement Do not confuse these two types of products. Newborns must have colostrum during the first hours after birth.(Preferably within the first hour! If the dam is colostrum deficient, use the colostrum replacer. The best colostrum replacer is frozen colostrum taken from does on your property who have already kidded. This colostrum will have the immunities needed for your particular location. If you don't have a supply of frozen colostrum, then you must use a commercially-prepared goat colostrum replacer. In such instances, usage of colostrum supplements along with the replacer is often helpful. Do not use colostrum or colostrum replacer beyond the first 24 hours of life, it is a waste of effort-babies cannot utilize it after 24 hours. Switch to goat's milk or whole cows milk.
CoRid OTC Oral Coccidiostat Treatment for Coccidiosis. Give kids 30-40 cc of mixture twice daily; adults should receive 70-80 cc twice daily. Confine the entire exposed herd to a single source of water for five consecutive days. Using the treatment dosage on the CoRid package, mix CoRid into the only source of water. In some areas, vets are finding that new strains of coccidia are resistant to CoRid and should consider Albon or its generic equivalent, Sulfadimethoxine 12.5%
Doprem Rx Eliminates respiratory distress in newborns caused by troubled births, including C-sections. Drop 2/10 cc under kid's tongue immediately upon birth to stimulate long activity. May also be used when kids are pulled out of their dams. Refrigerate.
Dexamethazone Rx A Cortico-Steroid-This is a very dangerous drug which should be used only under the supervision of a vet and as a last resort after other treatment has failed. Used for swelling and inflammation once infection is under control. Do not use if broken bones exist, it interferes with bone repair. Can cause abortion, so do not use on pregnant does. Vets use Dexamethazone to induce labor in pregnant does when the slow introduction of labor over a 48-hour period is desired. Dex interferes with the functioning of the goat's immune system. And usage of this drug must be tapered off slowly; serious health problems can occur if Dex is given in large amounts and then suddenly stopped. Tapering off over five days is a normal procedure, i.e. reducing the dosage each day for five consecutive days. Dosage varies depending upon the problem being treated. Keeps best in warm climates when refrigerated
Dyne OTC Nutritional Supplement high calorie liquid containing a maximum of nutrients for animals unable to eat solid foods or to supplement those who need added weight or have been stressed.
Epinephrine OTC A MUST HAVE! Powerful quick acting Vasoconstictor for use in circulatory collapse. Also used to counteract anaphylactic shock in animals. Always carry a loaded syringe with you when giving injections - you will NOT have time to go get it! Dosage is 1 cc SQ per 100 lbs
Fleet Enema OTC Over-the-counter product that is also useful for constipation and toxicity reactions, including Floppy Kid Syndrome. If you ever have a baby girl born with her vagina turned out, use a children's Fleet's enema (or generic equivalent) to move her bowels for the first time ("pass her plug") and the vagina will return to its proper position. Just make sure you put the enema into the rectal opening . . . and not the vagina! Children's enemas are preferred over Milk of Magnesia in very young kids who have been stressed or are ill with another problem
Ivomec 1% cattle injectable OTC Wormer-Delouser For eliminating stomach worms. A clear, oily liquid works best if used orally at a rate of 1 cc per 75 lbs. Do not under dose. Achieves a quicker "kill" via oral dosing.
Lixotinic OTC Vitamin Mineral Supplement with copper, iron liver fraction1,B-complex vitamins and peptonized iron to avoid gastric upset. Use during stress situations such as travel or debilitation.
Kopertox OTC Topical anti fungal Product for hoof rot and hoof scald. For topical application as a "liquid bandage"
Milk of Magnesia OTC Useful for constipation and toxicity reactions, including Floppy Kid Syndrome. Use as oral drench as t rate of 15 cc per 60 lbs.
Naxcel (ceftiofur sodium) Rx Excellent broad-spectrum antibiotic for respiratory illnesses (pneumonia). Comes in two bottles...one bottle contains a powder which must be kept refrigerated and another bottle of sterile water. When the two are mixed, they keep for only seven days. So draw up syringes in dosages of 1/2 cc 1 cc 2 cc and 3 cc, put needle caps on them, place the filled syringes in a ziplock baggy, label and date them, and put it in the freezer. Syringes thaw quickly, but hold the needle cap up, because some times the medication will settle into the needle cap. Dosages on the bottle are insufficient for goats. If newborn kids have respiratory distress or e.Coli infections, they must receive a minimum dosage IM of 1/2 cc daily for 5 consecutive days. A 100 pound goat needs at least 5-6 cc's of Naxcel IM over the 5-day course of treatment
Nuflor (Florfenicol) Rx Same as Naxcel.Antibiotic. Administer IM every other day for a minimum of three injections. Dosage is 1 cc per 25 lbs. Refrigerate
Nutri-Drench OTC Nutritional Supplement providing a rapid source of energy, vitamins A,D and E..trace minerals, amino acids,and glucose utilized in minutes. Orally 1 ml per 2 pounds body weight. Increases survivibility of newborn kids and prevents nutritional deficiencies.
Oxytocin Rx Use when a doe kids and does not pass her afterbirth. Must be used before the cervix closes (within approximately five hours after kidding). Causes contractions that expel the afterbirth. This is not a comfortable experience for the doe, so use it sparingly. Dosage is 1.5 cc per 100 lbs. Vet has recommend we use .5 cc to doe.
Pepto-Bismol OTC Control diarrhea in kids under one month old. Use up to 2 cc every four to six hours for newborns; 5 cc over the same time frame for kids approaching one month old. Follow up with oral ruminant get Probios to repopulate the gut with vital live bacteria used for digestion. Do not use Immodium AD to control diarrhea in goats, because it stops the peristaltic action of the gut and death is a likely result of its use.
Primor Rx Oral antibiotic that comes in tablet form, by weight of animal, for gut-related infections. Primor 120 is for 5-15 lb goats, Primor 240, 10-30 lb goats; Primor 600, 25-50 lb goats; and Primor 1200, 50-100 lb goats. Give two times the appropriate weight's dosage the first day, than then match the goat's weight for the next 9 consecutive days.
Probios OTC Used to get the rumen back working. Contains a source of live naturally occurring micro organisms. We use this prior to trips with goats and after shots to keep the rumen micro organisms in balance and working.
Propylene Glycol OTC Oral. For ketosis in does. Comes in one-gallon containers. Use 5-6 cc twice a day for an average-sized doe until she gets back on feed. Administer orally. If this product is not available, use molasses or Karo syrup
Red Cell OTC Oral Supplement. Red Cell can be used to combat anemia in goats. Packages in quart bottles, use it in conjunction with Vitamin B12 injections or as a stand-alone treatment. Should be administered daily via mouth for at least one week in no less than three cc amounts for an average-sized goat.
Re-Sorb oral electrolytes OTC Oral Electrolytes for re-hydrating sick animals, regardless of age. Can be used as an oral drench, put into baby bottles for kids to suck, or mixed into pans of drinking water. Each packet should be mixed with 1/2 gallon warm water
Spectrum Scour Halt OTC Oral Control diarrhea in adults and kids over one month of age. This is a pig scour medication which works well on goats. Follow label directions when pumping this liquid into the goat's mouth. Follow up with oral ruminant gel (Probios) to repopulate the gut with live bacteria necessary for food digestion
Synergized De-Lice OTC Topical Delousercontaining permethrins. Applied along the backbone from base of neck to base of tail. Follow the directions carefully, and do not use on kids under one month old. Maximum application is 3 oz. per animal, regardless of weight.
Tagament OTC Use in conjunction with Primor for gut-related pain resulting from illness like coccidia. Dosage is one half of a HR200 Tagamet (200 mg) for 3 - 5 days.
Tetanus Antitoxin OTC Vaccine Short term protection against tetanus and tetanus-like infections.(I use this at banding time or if you are disbudding) Comes in single-dose vials; use the entire vial IM for adults; cut it back proportionately for kids. No sooner than five days after this medication is last used, will have to re-vaccinate with CD/T and booster. Refrigerate.
Thiamine Hydrochloride 200mg/ml (Vitamin B1) Rx Injectable Vitamin Typically used by goat breeders in conjunction with large dosages of penicillan procaine G to treat listeriosis and goat polio. Moldy feed and hay may cause these illnesses. Administer slowly and with caution in doses of 50mgs - 0.25ml (1/4 of a cc) or higher . Anaphylactogenesis to parenternal thiamine has occured. Keep in darken place at room temperature 58-89F degrees. Dosage on bottle states 0.25ml/100lbs for horses. Ask your veterinarian what dose he wants you to use.
Tincture of Iodine 7% OTC Topical antiseptic for use to reduce the risk of infection of superficial cuts and abrasions. Use on navel cords at birth of kids after mother has cleaned them.
To-Day OTC For mastitis treatment in milking does. Milk out the bad milk/pus/blood and infuse one tube of To-Day into each infected udder for a minimum of two consecutive days.DO NOT reuse the tube-even if you only use a portion of it-You can re-infect the doe!
ToMorrow OTC For mastitis treatment in dry does(not milking). Follow the same procedure as for To-Day.
Valbazen OTC De-Wormer of the "white" de-wormer family. Can cause abortion in pregnant does at certain points in the the pregnancy
VetRx OTC Veterinary Remedy This is a great product found at feed stores. A liquid that treats both respiratory infection and ear mites. Based on a very old formula. Used externally and internally. Ear Mites: Coat inside of ears Repeat for 3 days. Or for Upper Respiratory symptoms: 3 drops inside of each nostril, 4 times daily for 3 days for adults; 2 drops in each nostril 3 times daily for 3 days for kids and lambs. Can be used safely in conjunction with any prescribed veterinary medication.
Vitamin B12 Rx Injectable Vitamin Supplement Wonderful for use on goats who are anemic from worms or stressed from just about any illness. Dosage 1cc per 100 lbs. Refrigerate
Vitamin B Complex OTC Injectable Vitamin Supplement Typically used by goat breeders to stimulate appetite and for use as a stress reducer in any stress related situation. Injected SubQ or IM at the rate of 1cc/20lbs. Keep in dark place at room temperature. Can be given orally in extreme situations where injection is not possible or desired.


Type of Injection How to Give it
Intra-Mammary Injected within the milk gland, the end of the teat through the natural opening stopping just after you have passed through the sphincter muscle. Always wash the teat end with soap and water and wipe it with alcohol and let it dry before injection. Use only sterile, blunt, teat infusion needles. Unclean material entering the teat will case mastitis.
Intramuscular (IM) Injected into the major muscle mass, in the hind leg or on the shoulder. It should be given with an 20 gauge, 1 inch needle, pointed straight into the muscle. Before injecting the medication, always withdraw on the syringe plunger to make sure you haven't hit a blood vessel. If this happens, blood will flow into the syringe. To correct, remove the needle and start over after you have discharged the blood from the syringe.
Subcutaneous (SQ or Sub-Q) Injected under the skin, usually in the neck or behind the shoulder. Usually a 1/2 inch needle is inserted at 45 degree angle into a "tent" of skin you have lifted with your other hand.
Intravenous (IV) Injected into a vein, usually the jugular or neck vein. This procedure takes some skill and practice. Become thoroughly familiar with the method before attempting to use it. The vein must be blocked with one hand near the shoulder to enlarge it and make it visible. Usually a 4 cm. 18 gauge needle is used for IV injections. All IV injections should be given slowly. The heart should be closely monitored as heart block may occur. This may be done by use of a stethoscope, placing your ear against the chest, or by feeling the heart beat with your hand.



(I am not a veterinarian, these methods are what work for me. Any medical procedures should be verified with your veterinarian before administering to your animals.)

Some Good Suppliers-Many have catalogs they will send you

Alpine Haus Online Purchasing Goat/Farm Books- Links to the Goat Community http://www.alpinehs.com/
Caprine Supply 33001 W 83rd St P O Box Y DeSoto, Ks 66018 Phone 1-800-646-7736 Fax 1-800-646-7796
Hoegger Supply Box 331 Fayetteville, Ga 30214 Phone 1-800-221-GOAT Fax 1-800-221-4628
Jeffers POBox 100 Dothan,AR 36301 Phone 1-800-JEFFERS(1-800-533-3377)
KV Vet Supply Co Rt 1 So Hwy 15 & 92 Box 245 David City, Ne 68632 Phone 1-800-423-8211 Fax 1-800-269-0093
Omaha Vaccine Box 7228 Omaha, Ne 68017 Phone 1-800-367-4444 Fax 1-800-242-9447
Pipestone Vet Supply 1300 So. Hwy. 75 P O Box 188 Pipestone, Mn 55164 Phone 1-800-658-2523 Fax 507-825-3140
Premier Sheep Supplies 2031 300th Street, Washington,IA 52353 Phone 1-800-282-6631
Valley Vet Supply Box 504 Marysville, Ks 66508 Phone 1-800-468-0059 Fax 1-800-446-5597
Last Updated ( Wednesday, 04 March 2009 )
 
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