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Ringer's Lactate Print E-mail
Written by Administrator-GL   
Friday, 13 November 2009
LACTATED RINGER’S INJECTION, USP
Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information published. However, it remains the responsibility of the readers to familiarize themselves with the product information contained on the US product label or package insert.

LACTATED RINGER’S INJECTION, USP

Abbott

Veterinary Lactated Ringer’s Injection, USP

- CAUTION: Federal Law (USA) restricts this drug to be used by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian.

- For Animal Use Only

- SINGLE USE - contains no preservatives

DESCRIPTION

Image

Veterinary Lactated Ringer’s Injection, USP is a sterile, nonpyrogenic solution containing isotonic concentrations of electrolytes in water for injection. The solution is isotonic. It is administered by intravenous infusion for parenteral replacement of extracellular losses of fluid and electrolytes.

Each 100 mL of Veterinary Lactated Ringer’s Injection, USP contains sodium chloride 600 mg, sodium lactate, anhydrous 310 mg, potassium chloride 30 mg and calcium chloride, dihydrate 20 mg. May contain hydrochloric acid and/or sodium hydroxide for pH adjustment. A liter provides 9 calories (from lactate), sodium (Na+), 130 mEq, potassium (K+) 4 mEq, calcium (Ca++) 3 mEq, chloride (Cl-) 109 mEq and lactate [CH3CH(OH) COO-] 28 mEq. The electrolyte content is isotonic (273 mOsmol/liter, calc.) in relation to the extracellular fluid (approx. 280 mOsmol/liter). The pH of the solution is 6.6 (6.0 to 7.5).

The solution contains no bacteriostat, antimicrobial agent or added buffer (except for pH adjustment) and is intended only for use as a single-dose injection. When smaller doses are required the unused portion should be discarded.

The solution is a parenteral fluid, nutrient and/or electrolyte replenisher.

Calcium Chloride, USP is chemically designated calcium chloride, dihydrate (CaCI2 • 2 H2O), white fragments or granules freely soluble in water.

Potassium Chloride, USP is chemically designated KCl, a white granular powder freely soluble in water.

Sodium Chloride, USP is chemically designated NaCl, a white crystalline powder freely soluble in water.

Sodium Lactate, USP is chemically designated monosodium lactate [CH3CH(OH)COONa], a 60% aqueous solution miscible in water. It has the following structural formula:

Water for Injection, USP is chemically designated H2O.

500 mL and 1000 mL: The flexible plastic container is fabricated from a clear multilayer polyolefin plastic film. Exposure to temperatures above 25°C/77°F during transport and storage will lead to minor losses in moisture content. Higher temperatures lead to greater losses. It is unlikely that these minor losses will lead to clinically significant changes within the expiration period.

3000 mL: The flexible plastic container is fabricated from a specially formulated polyvinylchloride. Water can permeate from inside the container into the overwrap but not in amounts sufficient to affect the solution significantly. Solutions inside the plastic container also can leach out certain of their chemical components in very small amounts before the expiration period is attained. However, the safety of the plastic has been confirmed by tests in animals according to USP biological standards for plastic containers.

CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

When administered intravenously, these solutions provide sources of water and electrolytes. Their electrolyte content resembles that of the principal ionic constituents of normal plasma and the solutions therefore are suitable for parenteral replacement of extracellular losses of fluid and electrolytes.

Calcium chloride in water dissociates to provide calcium (Ca++) and chloride (Cl-) ions. They are normal constituents of the body fluids and are dependent on various physiologic mechanisms for maintenance of balance between intake and output. Approximately 80% of body calcium is excreted in the feces as insoluble salts; urinary excretion accounts for the remaining 20%.

Potassium chloride in water dissociates to provide potassium (K+) and chloride (Cl-) ions. Potassium is found in low concentration in plasma and extracellular fluids (3.5 to 5.0 mEq/liter in a healthy adult). It is the chief cation of body cells (160 mEq/liter of intracellular water). Potassium plays an important role in electrolyte balance. Normally about 80 to 90% of the potassium intake is excreted in the urine; the remainder in the stools and to a small extent, in the perspiration. The kidney does not conserve potassium well so that during fasting or in patients on a potassium-free diet, potassium loss from the body continues resulting in potassium depletion.

Sodium chloride in water dissociates to provide sodium (Na+) and chloride (Cl-) ions. Sodium (Na+) is the principal cation of the extracellular fluid and plays a large part in the therapy of fluid and electrolyte disturbances. Chloride (Cl-) has an integral role in buffering action when oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange occurs in the red blood cells. The distribution and excretion of sodium (Na+) and chloride (Cl-) are largely under the control of the kidney which maintains a balance between intake and output.

Sodium lactate provides sodium (Na+) and lactate (C3H5O3-) ions. The lactate anion is in equilibrium with pyruvate and has an alkalizing effect resulting from simultaneous removal by the liver of lactate and hydrogen ions. In the liver, lactate is metabolized to glycogen which is ultimately converted to carbon dioxide and water by oxidative metabolism. The sodium (Na+) ion combines with bicarbonate ion produced from carbon dioxide of the body and thus retains bicarbonate to combat metabolic acidosis (bicarbonate deficiency). The normal plasma level of lactate ranges from 0.9 to 1.9 mEq/liter.

Water is an essential constituent of all body tissues and accounts for approximately 70% of total body weight. Average normal adult daily requirement ranges from two to three liters (1.0 to 1.5 liters each for insensible water loss by perspiration and urine production).

Water balance is maintained by various regulatory mechanisms. Water distribution depends primarily on the concentration of electrolytes in the body compartments and sodium (Na+) plays a major role in maintaining physiologic equilibrium.

INDICATIONS AND USAGE

These solutions are indicated for parenteral replacement of extracellular losses of fluid and electrolytes, as required by the clinical condition of the patient.

CONTRAINDICATIONS

Solutions containing lactate are NOT FOR USE IN THE TREATMENT OF LACTIC ACIDOSIS.

WARNINGS

Solutions containing calcium ions should not be administered simultaneously through the same administration set as blood because of the likelihood of coagulation.

Solutions which contain potassium should be used with great care, if at all, in patients with hyperkalemia, severe renal failure and in conditions in which potassium retention is present.

Solutions containing sodium ions should be used with great care, if at all, in patients with congestive heart failure, severe renal insufficiency and in clinical states in which there exists edema with sodium retention.

In patients with diminished renal function, administration of solutions containing sodium or potassium ions may result in sodium or potassium retention.

Solutions containing lactate ions should be used with great care in patients with metabolic or respiratory alkalosis. The administration of lactate ions should be done with great care where there is an increased level or an impaired utilization of lactate ions, as in severe hepatic insufficiency.

The intravenous administration of these solutions can cause fluid and/or solute overloading resulting in dilution of serum electrolyte concentrations, overhydration, congested states or pulmonary edema. The risk of dilutional states is inversely proportional to the electrolyte concentrations of administered parenteral solutions.

The risk of solute overload causing congested states with peripheral and pulmonary edema is directly proportional to the electrolyte concentrations of such solutions.

PRECAUTIONS

Clinical evaluation and periodic laboratory determinations are necessary to monitor changes in fluid balance, electrolyte concentrations and acid-base balance during prolonged parenteral therapy or whenever the condition of the patient warrants such evaluation.

Caution must be exercised in the administration of parenteral fluids, especially those containing sodium ions, to patients receiving corticosteroids or corticotropin.

Potassium containing solutions should be used with caution in the presence of cardiac disease, particularly in digitalized patients or in the presence of renal disease.

Solutions containing lactate ions should be used with caution as excess administration may result in metabolic alkalosis.

Do not administer unless solution is clear and container is undamaged. Discard unused portion.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

Reactions which may occur because of the solution or the technique of administration include febrile response, infection at the site of injection, venous thrombosis or phlebitis extending from the site of injection, extravasation and hypervolemia.

If an adverse reaction does occur, discontinue the infusion, evaluate the patient, institute appropriate therapeutic countermeasures and save the remainder of the fluid for examination if deemed necessary.

OVERDOSAGE

In the event of overhydration or solute overload, re-evaluate the patient and institute appropriate corrective measures. See WARNINGS, PRECAUTIONS, and ADVERSE REACTIONS.

DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

The dose is dependent upon the age, weight and clinical condition of the patient.

Lactated Ringer’s is administered by intravenous infusion. It may also be administered subcutaneously. The amount to be infused is based on replacement of losses of extracellular fluid volume in the individual patient. Up to 3 times the volume of estimated blood loss during and after surgery can be given to correct circulatory volume when there is only a moderate loss of blood.

Drug Interactions

Additives may be incompatible. Consult with pharmacist, if available. When introducing additives, use aseptic technique, mix thoroughly and do not store.

The presence of calcium limits their compatibility with certain drugs that form precipitates of calcium salts, and also prohibits their simultaneous infusion through the same administration set as blood because of the likelihood of coagulation.

Parenteral drug products should be inspected visually for particulate matter and discoloration prior to administration, whenever solution and container permit. See PRECAUTIONS.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR USE

500 mL and 1000 mL: Check for leaks by squeezing container firmly. If leaks are found, discard unit as sterility may be impaired. If supplemental medication is desired, follow directions below before preparing for administration.

1000 mL: To Open:

Tear outer wrap at notch and remove solution container. If supplemental medication is desired, follow directions below before preparing for administration. Some opacity of the plastic due to moisture absorption during the sterilization process may be observed. This is normal and does not affect the solution quality or safety. The opacity will diminish gradually.

500 mL and 1000 mL: To Add Medication

(Use aseptic technique)

1. Remove blue cap from BLU-MED™ sterile medication additive port at bottom of container.

2. With a needle of appropriate length, puncture resealable additive port and inject. Withdraw needle after injecting medication.

3. Mix container contents thoroughly.

4. The additive port may be protected by an appropriate cover.

3000 mL: To Add Medication

1. Prepare additive port.

2. Using aseptic technique and an additive delivery needle of appropriate length, puncture resealable additive port at target area, inner diaphragm and inject. Withdraw needle after injecting medication.

3. The additive port may be protected by covering with an additive cap.

4. Mix container contents thoroughly.

Preparation for Administration

(Use aseptic technique)

500 mL and 1000 mL: NOTE: See appropriate I.V. administration set Instructions for Use.

1. Close flow control clamp of administration set.

2. Remove cap from sterile administration set port at bottom of container.

3. Insert piercing pin of administration set into port with a twisting motion until the pin is firmly seated.

4. Suspend container.

5. Squeeze and release drip chamber to establish proper fluid level in chamber.

6. Open clamp. Eliminate air from remainder of set.

7. Attach set to patient access device.

8. Begin infusion.

3000 mL:

1. Close flow control clamp of administration set.

2. Remove cover from outlet port at bottom of container.

3. Insert piercing pin of administration set into port with a twisting motion until the set is firmly seated. NOTE: See full directions on administration set carton.

4. Suspend container from hanger.

5. Squeeze and release drip chamber to establish proper fluid level in chamber.

6. Open flow control clamp and clear air from set. Close clamp.

7. Attach set to venipuncture device. If device is not indwelling, prime and make venipuncture.

8. Regulate rate of administration with flow control clamp.

IMPORTANT: CONTAINS NO PRESERVATIVE. SINGLE DOSE. DISPOSE OF UNUSED CONTENTS.

WARNING: DO NOT USE FLEXIBLE CONTAINER IN SERIES CONNECTIONS.

HOW SUPPLIED

Veterinary Lactated Ringer's Injection, USP is supplied in 500 mL, 1000 mL and 3000 mL single-dose flexible plastic containers as follows:

Container Size

List No.

 

500 mL

07953-04-70

EN-2074/R1 07953

IM-1870/R1

1000 mL

07953-04-78

EN-2074/R1 07953

IM-1852/R1

3000 mL

7953-33

EN-1068

500 mL and 1000 mL: Store at 20 to 25°C (68 to 77°F). [See USP Controlled Room Temperature.] Protect from freezing.

3000 mL: Protect from freezing and excessive heat (any temperature above 40°C / 104°F). Store at controlled room temperature (15°C to 30°C / 59°F to 86°F).

500 mL and 1000 mL: Revised: April, 2009

3000 mL: Revised: October, 2005 ©2005 Abbott Laboratories

Manufactured For: Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, IL 60064

1 (888) 299-7416

NAC No.: 10240174

Last Updated ( Friday, 13 November 2009 )
 
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